Section Three: Violations and Sanctions Framework

Return to Section Two: Prohibited Behavior


The section below is a NEW ADDITION to the Student Handbook


Sanctions resulting from Honor Code and Code of Conduct violations become part of a student’s conduct record. Certain violation types and sanctions are deleted upon graduation.

The following sanctions are presumptive in nature. Sanctions are issued on a case-by-case basis and may not be reflected here, depending on the nature and severity of the violation, the presence of mitigating or aggravating circumstances, or whether the student has had a prior conduct violation.

The Office of the Dean of Students may place a hold on a student’s account in cases of non-compliance.

The sanction framework is a guide for decision-making when determining sanctions. The nature of the violation and specific circumstances will be considered when determining the actual sanction. The hearing officer will use this framework as a guide.

Any individual or combination of the below sanctions in this section

“Behavioral Requirement or Educational Program” This includes required activities including, but not limited to, mentoring, workshops, requirement to attend, present and/or participate in a program or sequence of programs related to the violation. The activities may be on campus, off campus, or on-line.

“Community Service” When connected or germane to the nature of the violation, assignment to work a specific number of hours at a community service site approved by the Office of Student Conduct. Community Service locations may exist on and off campus.

“Restitution” Compensation for damage caused to the University or any person’s property. This could also include situations such as failure to return a reserved space to proper condition, labor costs and expenses. This is not a fine, but rather, a repayment for labor costs and/or the value of property destroyed, damaged, consumed, or stolen .

“Restorative Actions” Requirement to engage in actions that attempt to make amends for the negative impact of a violation and repair the harm that resulted from the misconduct. These actions may include activities such as letters of apology, drafting and implementing a plan of resolution, engaging in restorative justice conferences, or developing plans for reintegration.

“Activities suspension” is defined as: A period of time during which a student remains as an enrolled student and continues his/her academic work but will have participation in non-academic activities limited as identified by the hearing officer. This may include ineligibility to participate or hold office in any student organization at the University or to represent the university outside of the community. Participation in study abroad programs, attending conferences/retreats as part of a non-academic activity, or participation in intercollegiate athletics, student organizations, or intramural teams will also be considered. Work-study jobs are not suspended during this time; any clarification concerning other activities that may be affected will be made by the Dean of Students or designee.

“Disciplinary probation” is defined as: A period of official censure and heightened scrutiny of the student’s behavior during the period of probation: a further violation by a student while on disciplinary probation will result in increased sanctions up to and including suspension or expulsion. A student may be required to meet periodically with a dean (or other University official) during his/her period of probation.

“University Housing Probation” Official notice that, should further violations of the Student Conduct Code occur during a specified probationary period, the student may be immediately removed from University Housing. Regular probationary meetings may also be imposed.

“University Housing Reassignment” Reassignment to another University housing facility as determined by the Department of Residence Life and Housing.

“University Housing Suspension or Expulsion” Removal from University housing for a specified period of time up to, and including, permanent removal. Conditions for re-admission to University housing may be specified. Under this sanction, a student is required to vacate University housing within 24-hours of notification of the action, though this deadline may be extended upon application to, and at the discretion of, the Dean of Residence Life and Housing. This sanction may be enforced with a trespass action if deemed necessary. This sanction may include a restriction to specified buildings or all University housing during the period of suspension or expulsion.

“On-campus Living Requirement” Removal from off-campus housing assignment to a University housing facility as determined by the Department of Residence Life and Housing.

“Residency Requirement Extension” Requirement to live on-campus beyond the specified residency requirement period. This requirement may be for a specified period of time up to a permanent extension throughout the duration of the student’s enrollment as an undergraduate student at the University.

“Suspension Withheld” The student has been suspended for a specified minimum period of time; however, the suspension is withheld as long as the student agrees to undergo other alternative sanctions such as drug testing or a specified educational program. This is a serious sanction since any additional violation of the Student Conduct Code or breaking the terms of the agreement to complete educational sanctions could result in immediate separation from the community.

“Suspension” Separation from the University for a specified minimum period of time, after which the student is eligible to return. Eligibility may be contingent upon satisfaction of specific conditions noted at the time of the suspension. During the suspension period, the student is banned from university property, functions, events and activities without prior written approval from the Dean of Students or designee.

“Expulsion” Permanent separation from the University. The student is banned from university property and the student’s presence at any University sponsored activity or event is prohibited. This action may be enforced with a trespass action as necessary.

“Revocation of Admission and/or Degree” Admission to or a degree awarded from the University may be revoked for fraud, misrepresentation, or other violation of University standards in obtaining the degree, or for other serious violations committed by a student prior to graduation.

“Withholding Degree” The University may withhold awarding a degree otherwise earned until the completion of the process set forth in this Student Conduct Code, including the completion of all sanctions imposed, if any.

Alcohol and Other Drug Sanctions

The sanctions listed above may be applied in addition to the alcohol and substance use prevention educational sanctions identified below.

AlcoholEdu for Sanctions: An online interactive alcohol and drug education program developed by Everfi.

BASICS Group: A group‑based intervention for alcohol and other drugs using a multi‑faceted individual feedback report to inform behavior modification and goal‑setting.

BASICS 1:1: A single‑session, individualized intervention based in Motivational Interviewing for alcohol and other drugs using a multi‑faceted individual feedback report to inform behavior modification and goal‑setting.

BASICS+: A four‑session, individualized intervention based in Motivational Interviewing for alcohol and other drugs using a multi‑faceted individual feedback report to inform behavior modification and goal‑setting.

Formal AOD Assessment: Formal assessment conducted by trained, licensed clinical staff regarding problematic use of alcohol and/or other drugs. Includes referral to additional services/resources as indicated.

Parental Notification: In all instances of alcohol and other drug violations, a student’s parents will be contacted by mail and/or phone.

The following guidelines serve as a framework for use of the above identified alcohol and other drug offenses sanctions or programs. The hearing officer may modify or add additional sanctions as deemed appropriate by the hearing officer in his/her discretion.

Charge First Offense Susequent Offense(s)
Low-level alcohol and other drug violations:
– Unauthorized Containers
– Purchase or Attempt to Purchase while Underage
– Underage Possession and/or Consumption
– Public Display
– Drinking Games
– Non-criminal possession of illegal drugs (e.g., typically less than 1.5 ounces marijuana)
– AlcoholEdu for Sanctions
– Drug testing, if applicable
– Ethics Course
– Outcome-based reflection
– Parental Notification
– Peer-to-Peer Conversation Program
– BASICS 1:1 (if student has already completed BASICS Group this year) and any recommended follow‐up from BASICS facilitator (could include formal AOD assessment if BASICS reveals high‐level use concerns)
– BASICS Group and any recommended follow‐up from BASICS facilitator (could include formal AOD assessment if BASICS reveals high‐level use concerns)
– Disciplinary Probation
– Drug testing
– Ethics Course
– Outcome-based reflection
– Parental Notification
– Peer-to-Peer Conversation Program
Mid-level alcohol and other drug violations:
– Alcohol Misuse (when involving hospitalization)
– Criminal Possession of Illegal Drugs, Prescription and/or Over-the-Counter Medication
– BASICS 1:1 and any recommended follow‐up from BASICS facilitator (could include formal AOD assessment if BASICS reveals high‐level use concerns)
– BASICS+ (if student has already completed BASICS 1:1 this year) and any recommended follow‐up from BASICS facilitator (could include formal AOD assessment if BASICS reveals high‐level use concerns)
– Disciplinary probation
– Drug testing, if applicable
– Ethics Course
– Outcome-based reflection
– Parental Notification
– Peer-to-Peer Conversation Program
– Activities Suspension
– Suspension Withheld
– Drug testing
– Ethics Course
– Housing Restrictions
– Outcome-based reflection
– Parental Notification
– Peer-to-Peer Conversation Program
– Substance Use Assessment. AOD Assessment with referral to appropriate level of care (includes BASICS Group, BASICS 1:1, BASICS+, or treatment services as indicated)
– Suspension
High-level alcohol and other drug violations:
– Driving While Impaired
– Illegal drug use (IV drug, crack, heroin, or methamphetamine use)
– Sale or Distribution of Illegal Drugs, Prescription and/or Over-the-Counter Medication
– Activities Suspension
– Disciplinary probation
– Drug testing
– Ethics Course
– Housing restrictions
– Parental Notification
– Substance Use Assessment. AOD Assessment with referral to appropriate level of care (includes BASICS Group, BASICS 1:1, BASICS+, or treatment services as indicated)
– Suspension
– Suspension Withheld
– Expulsion

Go to Section Four: Procedures


We appreciate your willingness to participate in updating the Student Handbook. Please be aware that this is a moderated process and abusive posts will be deleted. When leaving a comment, please copy/paste the text you wish to comment upon and keep in mind the following questions:

1. What objective is this policy/procedure trying to meet? How does it fail?
2. Can you suggest an alternative to the language proposed?
3. How would the alternative language meet the same objective or be more effective?

If you have any questions about the public comment process, please contact Matt Clifford at cliffomw@nullwfu.edu.


2 Comments

Jacob Brugh says:

I would suggest making the difference between Mid-level drug violations and High-level drug violations clearer. As it is currently written I am not sure if the High-level violation is for all illegal drugs that are not marijuana (i.e. decriminalized but not legal) or specifically for IV drug, crack, heroin, or methamphetamine.

Would possession, but not use, of an IV drug, crack, heroin, or methamphetamine be considered a mid-level violation which would move to a high level violation if use occurs? If so, I don’t feel this is a good policy because the only two reasons for possession of these drugs are use, or sale, and use is clearly less harmful to the community.

I would finally urge a reconsideration of the drug classifications to reflect not only the legal status of drugs, but also the potential harm they pose to the community. A number of studies by experts in the field of drug policy have scored various psychoactive substances according to the harm they pose users and society as a whole, and their findings should be considered if Wake Forest wants their drug policy to be effective. (here is one such study by a panel of UK researchers http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(10)61462-6/fulltext )

A number of substances which are currently placed on schedule I on the North Carolina Controlled Substances Act have been found by researchers to pose less risk than alcohol, tobacco, or marijuana. These most significantly include those substances collectively referred to as psychedelics including most notably LSD, DMT, Psilocybin Mushrooms, and Ecstasy (MDMA). Psilocybin Mushrooms and DMT are legally available in a number of countries and problems with them are incredibly rare. A separate category with reduced penalties for these substances would certainly make sense as they do not belong together with Crack, Heroin, and Methamphetamine.

I would suggest that the penalties for substance use and possession take the direct risk of individual substances, based on the available scientific evidence, into account rather than solely relying on NC law. If promoting the health and well being of students is Wake Forest’s highest priority, this is the only reasonable course of action.


Betsy Chapman says:

I would suggest that changing all references of “parents” to “parents/guardians” or “parents/family members” to be inclusive of students who are not from a nuclear family dynamic.


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